Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Glasgow Steamer Hestia lost off Grand Manan - October 1909

Get the pictures and subscribe at: http://fundytides.blogspot.com

Hestia porthole. Art MacKay


Bay of Fundy, NB Steamer HESTIA Lost, Oct 1909 Posted April 21st, 2010 by Stu Beitler
From: Gendisasters

GLASGOW STEAMER LOST.

THIRTY-FOUR MEN DROWNED IN THE BAY OF FUNDY.

SUFFERINGS OF SIX SURVIVORS.

The Glasgow steamer Hestia was wrecked on Grand Manan Island, in the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, in a storm on Monday, and thirty-four of those on board were drowned, only six being saved. There were five passengers on board, all of whom appear to have been drowned.
The vessel, says a Reuter telegram from East Port, Maine, ran on to a shoal at Old Proprietor Ledge, her bows were impaled on a rock, and her after part, swinging free, was tossed high by the heavy seas. The captain had the boats lowered at the first shock, and as the vessel heeled over, and great waves swept her deck, the work was exceedingly difficult. In one of the boats four Scottish boys who were passengers were placed, with twelve of the crew. The boat, however, capsized, and all were drowned except two of the men. Still another boat was lowered, in which the captain took his place, with all the rest of the crew except six, who were left on board. When the gale abated in the afternoon the six men left on board were rescued by lifeboats. These, says a Lloyd's telegram, are the third officer (STEWART), the second engineer (MORGAN), and four seamen, KEEN (?Brian), McKENZIE, SMYTH, and McVICAR. The Hestia is a total wreck.

Three of the boats drifted ashore on Wednesday; two were empty, and the third contained four dead bodies.

38 Hours In The Rigging.
The third mate gives the following particulars:
The discovery of the ship's plight from the shore was delayed by thick weather. The survivors were lashed to the rigging for thirty-eight hours without either food or water, and when they were taken off by the lifeboat their condition was pitiable. Their sufferings were so terrible that it is feared that one of their number will not recover. After they had been in the rigging for twenty-four hours there were indications that caused them to fear that the mast would fall, and they therefore changed their position, working their way slowly and cautiously to the bridge, which was still out of water. It was, however, so exposed to the seas breaking over the vessel that they were obliged to return to the rigging.

Crew Of Clyde Men.
It is supposed that the vessel was misled by a wrong light, with the result that she was carried miles out of her course. She left Glasgow for St. John's, New Brunswick, on October 10th, with a crew of thirty-five, five passengers and a general cargo.

All the crew were shipped at Glasgow, and were chiefly Clyde men. The four Glasgow boys reported drowned were on their way to Canada in charge of horses with which to start farming.

The list of crew and passengers is as follows:
Captain H. M. NEWMAN.
First Officer T. McNAIR.
Second Officer JOHN McPHUN.
Third Officer S. STEWART.
Carpenter WILLIAM CALDWELL.
Boatswain ALEX DUNIGAN.
A.B.'s JAMES SMYTH, JOE SMYTH, B. BRIAN, A. MURRAY, C. McVICAR, D. GIBSON, JOHN McKENZIE, and WILLIAM CANDLESS.
Ordinary Seaman D. SINCLAIR.
Chief Engineer P. F. MUNN.
Second Engineer A. MORGAN.
Third Engineer H. SCOTT.
Fourth Engineer W. S. BEST.
Donkeyman HUGH SPIERS.
Storekeeper W. WARNOCK.
Firemen CHARLES DOEHERTY, P. HANNAH, JAMES RODGER, A. DUBRAN, A. MARTIN, and JOHN DONOCHIE.
Trimmers DANIEL CLARK, JOHN McFARLANE, DAVID McLEON, and JOHN O'NEIL.
Chief Steward A. McLEAN.
Second Steward A. GRAHAM.
Cook R. LAVERY.
Assistant Steward W. HART.
Passengers, JAMES WELSH, JAMES GALLOWAY and R. GALLOWAY (brothers), T. REID and D. COWAN.

The Hestia was a steel screw steamer of 2,434 tons, built in 1890. She belonged to the Donaldson Line of Glasgow.

Hackney Express Middlesex London 1909-10-30

Monday, February 11, 2013

Backgrounder - Study shows severe nuclear accident at Point Lepreau 40 times more likely than previously thought


February 5, 2013.
On Friday January 18 2013 NB Power released the preliminary results of a study that showed
that NB Power has grossly underestimated earthquake risk. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
(CNSC) ordered a new site specific seismic hazard study be completed as a result of CCNB Action’s
intervention at the licensing hearings for Point Lepreau on Dec 2 2011. The preliminary results show that
the probability of a severe accident with a large release of radiation to the public is more than 40 times
greater than NB Power’s first submission to the CNSC and is 4 times greater than internationally
accepted safety goals.  This shows that Lepreau went from being the safest reactor in North America vis
a vis earthquakes , to one of the most dangerous
i
.
The Point Lepreau nuclear generating station’s ability to withstand earthquakes has been a topic
of controversy ever since it was built, when the lead seismic engineer resigned over the issue. This

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

OPINION: From Off the Coast of Massachusetts: A Cautionary Tale About Natural Gas Infrastructure


CLF Scoop: From Off the Coast of Massachusetts: A Cautionary Tale About Natural Gas Infrastructure

Posted: 30 Jan 2013 07:55 AM PST
The front page of the Boston Globe last week presented a powerful, timely and cautionary tale about  two liquefied natural gas terminals  that sit off the coast of Gloucester and Salem. Those terminals are the tangible reminder of a massive push undertaken by energy industry insiders to build such terminals.  The intensity of that push, which began to build around 2002, becoming most intense during the 2004  to 2007 period and then petering out in the years since, contrasts sharply with the reality described in the Globe article: that those two offshore terminals have sat idle for the last two years.
That push to build LNG import facilities, which was such a mania in energy industry circles circa 2005, yielded some crazy ideas, like the proposal to hollow out a Boston Harbor Island and the infamous Weavers Cove project in Fall River. The offshore terminals, while the least bad of those proposals, reflected short sighted thinking detached from careful regional planning.  Both in terms of the need for these facilities and design decisions like regulators not forcing the projects to share one pipeline to shore instead of (as they did) twice disturbing the marine environment to build two duplicative pieces of infrastructure.
Today, the hue and cry is no longer about LNG, instead we are bombarded with impassioned demands for more natural gas pipelines as well as more measured discussions of the need for "smart expansions". Will we have the collective intelligence to be smarter and more careful this time? Will the permitting process force consideration, as the law requires, of alternatives that make better use of existing infrastructure and pose less risk to the environment and the wallets of customers? Fixing natural gas leaks and becoming much more efficient in our use of gas is a key "supply strategy" that needs to be on the table and fully examined before committing to new pipelines.
And as it so often is, the overarching issue here is protecting future generations by addressing the climate issue. Science and prudent energy analysis, makes it clear that we need to put ourselves on a trajectory to end the burning of fossil fuels, including natural gas by the middle of this century. Given this reality every proposal to build massive and long-lived facilities to import more of those fuels must be viewed with great skepticism.

Study shows severe nuclear accident at Point Lepreau 40 times more likely than initially thought.

NB Power
NB Power (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On Friday January 18 2013 NB Power released the preliminary results of a study that showed that NB Power has

grossly underestimated earthquake risk. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) ordered a new site

specific seismic hazard study be completed as a result of CCNB Action’s intervention at the licensing hearings for

Point Lepreau on Dec 2 2011.

For refurbishment in 2007, the CNSC told NB Power to show that there was only a 1 in 10,000 years chance of core

meltdown and a 1 in 100,000 years chance of a large release of radiation if earthquakes were added to its

probabilistic safety analysis. In 2007, NB Power reported to the CNSC that the chances of core meltdown and a

large radiation release at Pt Lepreau from earthquakes were 1 in a million years. Using data from the new study,

CCNB Action calculated that the chances of core meltdown are 1 in 7,825 years. For a large release of radiation,

chances are 1 in 25,000 years, an increase of almost 40 times the original NB Power submission.

CCNB Action’s Chris Rouse is not surprised at the results. “Whether or not Point Lepreau is able to handle

earthquakes has been a controversy ever since it was built. The lead seismic engineer quit stating that the

regulator was downplaying the seismicity of Point Lepreau, and that he recommended not building it at that

location. Recently, we found many errors in NB Power’s technical assessments that we reviewed as interveners in

the licensing hearings. We hope this study will alert the CNSC as to how dangerous Pt Lepreau really is and hope

they start doing their job and shut it down before something serious happens.”

New data warns us:

-Pt Lepreau no longer meets internationally accepted safety goals, as stated at the time of licensing.

-the chance of a severe accident with a large release of radiation (1 in 25,000 yrs) is 4x more likely than the

regulator believed at the time of licensing (1 in 100,000 yrs)

- Pt Lepreau is now one of the most dangerous reactors in North America

CCNB Action’s Saint John Fundy chapter chair, Sharon Murphy, stated her group’s concern. “We know they

seriously underestimated the costs and the time it would take to refurbish. Now, this new study shows that the

risks have also been underestimated. Science not only shows that the next significant regional earthquake will

likely be near Pt Lepreau, it now is clearly showing that Pt Lepreau won’t survive the shaking.” For more

information contact:

Sharon Murphy 506-639-9929 sharon_e_murphy@hotmail.com

Chris Rouse 506-650-0007 chris_r_31@hotmail.com